Comments on: Can A Home Inspector Be Wrong? : Evaluating an Inspection Report https://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/for-the-seller/when-a-home-inspector-makes-himself-look-like-a-fool/ Thu, 02 Mar 2017 12:58:02 -0600 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.13 By: frankschulteladbeck https://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/for-the-seller/when-a-home-inspector-makes-himself-look-like-a-fool/#comment-1464 Sat, 27 Feb 2010 11:37:50 +0000 http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/?p=184#comment-1464 Well, I am always open to guest posts :) The T&P valve should be a material that can withstand the heat, so CPVC is acceptable, because PVC could melt. The drain pan was not commonly placed under water heaters for many years, but it does serve as an extra precaution against leaks. The home that I was inspecting yesterday evening had the unit in the attic, and the hose bib for flushing the system had a small leak. That could have damaged the insulation, ceiling, and over time the framing (the house was a foreclosure with property managers not visiting often). About 75% of the houses that I inspect have no drain pan. Sometimes I let the client know that there may be on issue, if the unit is in the garage on a stand. It depends upon the location then. Texas has a set of rules which requires us to mention certain items for safety reasons that most homes do not have, like the new AFCI circuit breakers.

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By: Steve https://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/for-the-seller/when-a-home-inspector-makes-himself-look-like-a-fool/#comment-1463 Sat, 27 Feb 2010 04:21:45 +0000 http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/?p=184#comment-1463 Oh, that’s interesting. I don’t believe the pans are required here in California. I have also seen pvc pipe use for the T&P valve drain lines when visiting new homes.
Hey, this could be a great site for inspection stories. There’s got to be some good ones out there.

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By: frankschulteladbeck https://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/for-the-seller/when-a-home-inspector-makes-himself-look-like-a-fool/#comment-1461 Fri, 26 Feb 2010 20:08:46 +0000 http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/?p=184#comment-1461 Thank you for commenting. You are right; we inspectors are not supposed to make judgements in most cases. As for the pan, it is a requirement, so that is why he listed it.

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By: Steve https://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/for-the-seller/when-a-home-inspector-makes-himself-look-like-a-fool/#comment-1460 Fri, 26 Feb 2010 18:58:11 +0000 http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/?p=184#comment-1460 It’s best not to say too much. A plumber did an inspection of a friends house when their dining room tile popped up. About 10 tiles buckled. He scared them when he told them that he suspected a crack due to a leak and perhaps foundation problems. The plumber came out and looked for a leak but couldn’t find one. To release himself from liability he wrote on his report that it was a dangerous situation and that a structural engineer was required to make an evalualtion. Now the insurance company is mandating that, and wants to drop them. It seems they may have grounds for a lawsuit aganist the plumber for putting him in this situation. It appears merely to be a poor tile job with solid perimeter cannection especially around a fireplace hearth. No allowance was made for expansion and expansion did occur. When I pulled up the tiles, something the plumber should have done, I found a nice solid surface below and loose tiles everywhere due to insufficient bonding to the concrete floor. The thinset was perhaps too dry and the floor was dusty or dirty. I was put on the phone to discuss my findings, and what I found interesting was that the first thing the plumber asked me was if I was a structural engineer. I told him no, but that I have been a builder for 30 years and worked with engineers in the past regarding problems of this nature. Then he went out on a limb and made a judgement that it was unsafe! Duh! Aren’t inspectors suppose to make observations without so many judgements? He should have followed that mindset.
For instance in the water heater case above where the inspector wrote up the missing pan. So what if you don’t have a pan under it. Is that required? If your water heater is where you see it, in most cases you will see evidence of a leak before it becomes a flood. Or if it is locatin in a place where leakage will do no damage, what’t the big deal. That’s not to discount that you shouldn’t take precautions but is it mandatory?

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