Comments on: How to Repair Your Fascia http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/living-in-your-home/ihow-repair-fasciai/ Wed, 21 Aug 2013 10:45:36 -0500 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.6 By: frankschulteladbeck http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/living-in-your-home/ihow-repair-fasciai/#comment-5277 Wed, 24 Oct 2012 13:43:44 +0000 http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/?p=779#comment-5277 I have seen this done successfully, but I have to admit that there is a chance of this being a problem. In the answer to Anita, I mention the fact that rafters might be already effected by the moisture problems. Just covering the fascia with another material may not actually repair anything. I suggest that first rotted material should be removed. A patch can then be made to fill in the space that is left. Before the patch goes into place, you should check the rafters for damage. If the rafter ends are good, proceed with the patch. If they are not good, check on the extent of the damage to make the appropriate repairs. Covering the existing fascia with a thin material like Hardie planks that is 1/8″ thick can offer extra protection. First, a material like Hardie plank may be less prone to moisture problems, especially if placed under the kickout flashing of the roof covering. Next it is pretty good at avoiding some damage. If your fascia has no damage, the cleaning, sanding, and painting option would be the way to go in my opinion. Adding material may help, but there is also the chance of causing problems. What I have seen is repair work on the fascia has caused damage to the kickout flashing, so moisture collects on the fascia, causing further rot.

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By: frankschulteladbeck http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/living-in-your-home/ihow-repair-fasciai/#comment-5276 Wed, 24 Oct 2012 13:32:37 +0000 http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/?p=779#comment-5276 The fascia, as with all exterior wall coverings, has the purpose of protecting the framing of the home. Rafters which support the sheathing or battens on which your roof covering sit need to be protected from the weather to prevent damage to the home. The fascia is simply a board at the end of the rafters to create this protective barrier. If you have rot, then you have a moisture issue. Somehow moisture is causing the fascia to deteriorate. There is a good chance that rot in the fascia may be effecting the rafters. The solution is to first determine why is there rot. Remedy the cause, then repair the fascia.

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By: sydney http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/living-in-your-home/ihow-repair-fasciai/#comment-5271 Wed, 24 Oct 2012 04:22:58 +0000 http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/?p=779#comment-5271 IIs it a good idea to COVER the existing 40 yrs old fascia boards with HARDIE PLANKS???

or just pressure wash, sand and paint the existing fascia board and let go.
I appreciate ur advice

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By: anita http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/living-in-your-home/ihow-repair-fasciai/#comment-5265 Mon, 22 Oct 2012 19:46:50 +0000 http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/?p=779#comment-5265 what is purpose of facia and what happens when facia has rotted in spots?

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By: frankschulteladbeck http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/living-in-your-home/ihow-repair-fasciai/#comment-4977 Wed, 09 May 2012 21:07:01 +0000 http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/?p=779#comment-4977 Thank you Betsey.

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By: Betsey http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/living-in-your-home/ihow-repair-fasciai/#comment-4974 Mon, 30 Apr 2012 17:21:47 +0000 http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/?p=779#comment-4974 Fantastic blog – very detailed. I will pass on to friends and homeowners looking to do their own repairs.

Betsey

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By: frankschulteladbeck http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/living-in-your-home/ihow-repair-fasciai/#comment-4973 Mon, 30 Apr 2012 10:36:54 +0000 http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/?p=779#comment-4973 Hello Judith,
I know different manufacturers are starting to replicate various past building features, such as the embossed tin panels for the ceiling can be found in a modern form at building supply centers. I have not encountered the tin fascia though. Your best bet may be a salvage yard. There is one in San Francisco that is quite large (if memory serves me well; I know that there is one in New Orleans). Habitat for Humanity also runs salvage yard/stores that they call the ReStore. I often find great material there. Sorry that I cannot be of more help. Frank

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By: Judith Turner http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/living-in-your-home/ihow-repair-fasciai/#comment-4972 Fri, 27 Apr 2012 18:48:42 +0000 http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/?p=779#comment-4972 Frank,
We’ve just purchased a prairie house in San Jose CA in the Naglee Park area. There’s currently a hip/mansard roof installed on top of the original one which we are going to have removed. As part of the restoration project I would love to find some tin fascia — I’ve noticed some of the other prairie homes have this installed. Any info would be much appreciated. Thanks.

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By: frankschulteladbeck http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/living-in-your-home/ihow-repair-fasciai/#comment-4887 Fri, 02 Mar 2012 11:48:53 +0000 http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/?p=779#comment-4887 Thank you for those tips Josh.

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By: Josh Roberson http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/living-in-your-home/ihow-repair-fasciai/#comment-4886 Fri, 02 Mar 2012 11:04:31 +0000 http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/?p=779#comment-4886 This was a great post. I will refer my clients to this post often. As a gutter installer, all too often I see customers who put off what might be a minor repair thinking it will go away only to have to do a complete facia removal and new gutter system install later down the road. A simple once a year check up can prevent thousands of dollars in repairs later. Gutter guards or leaf blockers are another great way to preserve the gutter system.

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