Comments on: A Seller’s Response to a Buyer’s Home Inspection Report http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/for-the-seller/a-sellers-response-to-a-buyers-home-inspection-report/ Wed, 21 Aug 2013 10:45:36 -0500 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.6 By: frankschulteladbeck http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/for-the-seller/a-sellers-response-to-a-buyers-home-inspection-report/#comment-9311 Mon, 15 Jul 2013 13:20:13 +0000 http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/?p=175#comment-9311 I cannot speak as to why the home inspector reported what he did. Different states have different standards, but in principal, the home inspector is to report the condition as he finds it on that day of the inspection. In general, he should provide information to help the buyer make a better decision. This may mean suggesting that a mold test be performed, when the inspector has a concern. I sometimes have to report on possibilities, because there is a chance that something may happen; however, I state the facts of the situation first. With older homes, it is easy to say that the framing does not meet current standards (since it was not built to that standard), but I would have to report on the chance of a future problem due to what I see (a crack in a framing piece, for example).

If you feel that this inspector did not fairly represent the facts, there is the chance for recourse. In states where a license or certification is required to perform home inspections, the agency which oversees that process will have some means to file a complaint. Otherwise, an attorney specializing in the field of real estate will have answers for you.

Most lawsuits over the sale of a home stem from the Seller’s Disclosure. It is best to disclose what you know. As for the report, if you have a copy, you may wish to discuss this with your real estate agent. It may be better to mention this in the disclosure, and then write your own notes on the report to state your side. Then again, the agent may state a better course of dealing with this report.

]]>
By: Laura http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/for-the-seller/a-sellers-response-to-a-buyers-home-inspection-report/#comment-9299 Tue, 25 Jun 2013 17:54:07 +0000 http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/?p=175#comment-9299 My buyer’s home inspector made several comments about things that were original to the house and would not (and have not) caused any problems in the 61 years since the home was built. For example, a floor joist was cut away to allow placement of a toilet in the only bathroom the house had originally. That was pretty standard back then. He said there was wetness under the toilet I had just had installed 2 weeks ago, so I called my plumber back out, he pulled the toilet and found no source of a leak, but relealed the entire thing, added a flange (which makes the toilet more likely to get clogged but will keep it from leaking – which is worse?) He also raised questions as to some discoloration on my attic ceiling, and asked “is this mold” which scared my buyer and she immediately backed out of the sale. He also said there was no electricity running to a GFCI outlet in my bathroom. If he had turned on the light in the room, he would have been able to see that there was indeed electricity running to the radio that was plugged in that outlet, as well as being able to test that the GFCI actually worked. He also said that a safety switch had been removed from my furnace, when in reality there was never a switch to begin with. He questioned the lacement of support piers in two area of the crawl – which I had disclosed!!! – and said they were inadequate and wondered why they were there. The floor joist was sagging (61 year old house) and so I had it resupported. He questioned why the water heater was in a closet in the bedroom, and said it was a carbon monoxide risk and speculated that I had removed that bedroom’s second door because I knew about the “risk>” My water heater has been changed twice in the time I’ve lived in the house, both times by licensed plumbers. The gas company has also inspected the house and found no deficiencies. The water heater is vented to the attic and there is a 2 inch gap under the door for additional ventilation. He recommended a carbon monoxide monitor. Did he not see the one I already had? Actually, I have two, because I have a fireplace, which he also had problems with because the gas line was not done to current code (again, the house is 61 years old). I am so incredibly angry I am ready to sue him. There were a couple of items on the report that were genuinely wrong, and I addressed those the next day (they scared me too – like uninsulated wiring and an open junction box in my crawlspace), but my buyer was long gone by then. What recourse do I have? What do I have to disclose? Why should I disclose something that was a “might?”

]]>
By: frankschulteladbeck http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/for-the-seller/a-sellers-response-to-a-buyers-home-inspection-report/#comment-4848 Thu, 09 Feb 2012 19:08:56 +0000 http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/?p=175#comment-4848 He did not inform the buyers either? That seems strange. I had a situation when I did have to turn off the water to a home due to the failure of some equipment when tested. Once I realized that this would be a bad leak, I turned off the water. I then wrote a note for the homeowner, and I left my business card. I then contacted the Realtor representing the buyers who had hired me to let him know about the situation. The buyers were out of town, but I did let them know in the report. That was the best way I could find to ensure that everyone would find out. Although there is no rule stating that I should have taken these steps, this is simple courtesy. In your case, you may wish to check to see if there is a body governing home inspectors to let them know what occurred to see if he followed their rules. Otherwise, writing a review on a site like Google Places can let others know of bad service.

]]>
By: cathy hatch http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/for-the-seller/a-sellers-response-to-a-buyers-home-inspection-report/#comment-4847 Thu, 09 Feb 2012 18:40:59 +0000 http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/?p=175#comment-4847 ok im the seller. the inspector found a leak in the furnace valve and turned my furnace off. He never told anyone. I found out 4 days later when I went to the house with the gas company and it was freezing inside in december and below 0 out. My pipes could have froze! I sent the inspector a letter telling him how upset I was and he was a real jerk about it, never apoplogized and said he did the right thing and didnt have to comtact me.

]]>
By: Louisville Home Inspector http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/for-the-seller/a-sellers-response-to-a-buyers-home-inspection-report/#comment-4831 Thu, 19 Jan 2012 21:14:39 +0000 http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/?p=175#comment-4831 great article….thanks Frank.

]]>
By: frankschulteladbeck http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/for-the-seller/a-sellers-response-to-a-buyers-home-inspection-report/#comment-4820 Wed, 04 Jan 2012 12:12:17 +0000 http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/?p=175#comment-4820 I cannot speak to the accuracy of his report, but I do wish to point out one item: the cracks in the bricks. You are correct that bricks are not structural; however, depending upon the nature of the cracks, this can indicate a structural issue. If the weight from the roof or the upwards pressure from the foundation are not going through the structural elements as they should, they can go through the veneer siding, in your case the brick. The cracks can denote a structural issue, but these could also denote movement in the home. Movement is common to all homes; the concern would be if the movement is effecting the structure. This is why the inspector reported on those cracks; however, not all cracks are created equal: some brick designs include cracks on the surface.

A real estate attorney would be able to answer if you have some case against the inspector, but I feel that may be hard to prove (this is only a guess without all of the facts on my part, so you should seek further consultation to see if there is a case). From what you describe, the home inspector did not investigate properly, so you may have recourse to file a complaint with the authority overseeing his business. In Texas, this would be the Texas Real Estate Commission. For other states, you will have to look at my info on inspectors page. By filing a complaint, the authority will evaluate the situation to decide upon a course of action. Severe transgressions can lead to the loss of his license in Texas; other transgressions can cause him a fine.

]]>
By: Donna http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/for-the-seller/a-sellers-response-to-a-buyers-home-inspection-report/#comment-4819 Wed, 04 Jan 2012 01:26:19 +0000 http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/?p=175#comment-4819 In my case, the home inspector made statements that were not true, pointing out places where he believed water had entered, but it never has. The discoloration on the wall was from shoe scuffs. He also made statements such as the siding appeared to have been installed by an amateur…it was a major home builder company who installed it. He also implied there could be major structural issues but probably weren’t in other cases. It scared the buyers away and I lost the sale. The house was inspected by the builder because it is still under warranty and they found no structural issues at all. He pointed out superficial cracks in brick veneer as being indication of possible structural problems, though they are only superficial siding…not part of the house structure at all. I am angry but have no recourse to this terrible report. Both Realtors agreed the report was badly written and derogatory. I wish there was something I could do to counteract this inaccurate report.

]]>
By: frankschulteladbeck http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/for-the-seller/a-sellers-response-to-a-buyers-home-inspection-report/#comment-3406 Wed, 19 Oct 2011 13:50:42 +0000 http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/?p=175#comment-3406 I cannot say why buyers will wait long. Sometimes, when they are working without a Realtor, they do not know how to proceed well. With a Realtor, they may be in discussions to find the best way to respond. Obviously, the quicker the response, the better for negotiations.

]]>
By: mari http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/for-the-seller/a-sellers-response-to-a-buyers-home-inspection-report/#comment-3388 Fri, 14 Oct 2011 18:57:04 +0000 http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/?p=175#comment-3388 Why would a buyer wait so long to respond to an inspection report when the deficiencies were few and very minor?

]]>
By: Torrance real estate inspection http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/for-the-seller/a-sellers-response-to-a-buyers-home-inspection-report/#comment-2261 Wed, 18 Aug 2010 12:51:46 +0000 http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/?p=175#comment-2261 Thanks for the information and this is really gonna help one who is going to buy the house.

]]>