Comments on: Home Inspection Scams http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/for-the-homeowner/home-maintenance-for-the-homeowner/home-inspection-scams/ Wed, 21 Aug 2013 10:45:36 -0500 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.6 By: frankschulteladbeck http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/for-the-homeowner/home-maintenance-for-the-homeowner/home-inspection-scams/#comment-7524 Sat, 17 Nov 2012 00:15:33 +0000 http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/?p=119#comment-7524 There have been situations where home inspectors have been caught creating a report to appeal to an agent, but as of this time, I have not heard of a home inspector forging a report for a buyer when paid to do so. This has been a statement made by sellers on many occasions though. If there is proof that a home inspector actually falsified a report, then you should report them to the proper authorities, which is listed on my info on home inspectors page.

As for the sample report, there is something that ought to be considered. My sample reports are based on examples from actual home inspections. I sometimes add or delete data to make the sample report reflective of a norm for that type of inspection. Since I write my reports, I often do use phrasing that is similar from report to report. If I used inspection writing software, which many inspectors use, then of course phrasing would be the same, since the software uses pre-packaged phrases. If the home fits the norm, then the sample report may be quite similar.

Maybe this would be a space to address one other issue that arises. Home inspectors are looking at the same components of the home. There has been a statement made that one report must be wrong because another home inspector found the same thing wrong. The implication being that the home inspectors were in collusion. Are the home inspectors really operating together? For this to be the case, they would have to know each other; they would have to know that they are inspecting the same house; then they would have to plan out how there reports will be written. Conspiracy theories are fun, but this really might not be the case.

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By: Sandy http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/for-the-homeowner/home-maintenance-for-the-homeowner/home-inspection-scams/#comment-7427 Fri, 16 Nov 2012 04:37:39 +0000 http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/?p=119#comment-7427 And what about the other side of the coin … if the home inspector was paid a lot by the buyer to write a negative report, in order to get the price down, and the report was over the top with items not valid, and not applicable to the ordinary inspection report, and was nearly verbatim to a sample report on the inspector’s website? What action could the seller take in that case, when the report is truly out of bounds? Sandy

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By: frankschulteladbeck http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/for-the-homeowner/home-maintenance-for-the-homeowner/home-inspection-scams/#comment-4860 Tue, 21 Feb 2012 11:22:27 +0000 http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/?p=119#comment-4860 Mary, I am sorry that you had suffered such a horrible experience. I would refer you to my comments to the home inspector Willie above for my thoughts. As for the television show, I have only seen one episode (I do not watch much television). What I saw on that episode made for great television, but it would have been impossible for an inspection. We cannot break down parts of the house to discover a problem. As for our forms, I use the form that is required by my state. Maybe a person can see that document as releasing us from some simply because it states how an inspector is to perform an inspection, but that is not the intention of that form. The only other requirement that I know is that insurance agencies will insist upon a form that can be considered a liability form, which is called an inspection agreement. Again, this is imposed upon the inspector. In no state of our union is a home inspector free of liability. Can he or she be held accountable? That is another matter which has to be pursued through the system set up by that state. If an inspector should have reasonably found and reported an issue, then the state will have some means of holding him accountable. That may be a state agency which provides oversight, or this may occur through the court system. In the end, if the inspector truly did something wrong, he can be held accountable.

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By: Mary http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/for-the-homeowner/home-maintenance-for-the-homeowner/home-inspection-scams/#comment-4859 Tue, 21 Feb 2012 03:52:46 +0000 http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/?p=119#comment-4859 Instead of having a release of liability on the front of your forms you should all put a statement of: I stand by my property inspection, and I am accountable for the work that I have done. I stand behind it and will pay for the errors that I make.

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By: Mary http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/for-the-homeowner/home-maintenance-for-the-homeowner/home-inspection-scams/#comment-4858 Tue, 21 Feb 2012 03:34:09 +0000 http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/?p=119#comment-4858 I stand by what I say. A home purchase for many people is their biggest expense in life. When a property inspection goes terribly wrong, and serious defects exist which effect safety and health those buyers are stuck with it. Sometimes these issues cost 50k or more to repair. Never again in my life will I ever put faith in any property inspector, builder, or realestate agent. My heart goes out to those on this blog who have been seriously harmed by people who only see money as being their bottom line. Greed is such an erosive act, one that has the potential to destroy lives. Property Inspection is one industry that needs major over sight, or to be handled completely by those who know what they are doing such as Mike Holmes on Holmes on Homes. In America we need more people like him who MAKE IT RIGHT! To any Property Inspector who reads this blog, I want you to remember you’re helping people to decide if they should buy a home or not. A home represents a place of safety.. a place families can feel secure in and create memories. Your inspections are more than just getting paid at the end. I am going to do everything I can to push fourth with legislation in my State that forces laws with teeth to be enforced. I will knock on every door in my community to get signatures for such legislation to become law. There has to be more over sight in this industry, as well as the building and realestate industry in our country. There are far too many scams that occur.. ones that greatly harm the buyers on so many levels.

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By: frankschulteladbeck http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/for-the-homeowner/home-maintenance-for-the-homeowner/home-inspection-scams/#comment-4857 Mon, 20 Feb 2012 19:13:41 +0000 http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/?p=119#comment-4857 Mary, is it possible that one bad experience on your part is causing you to condemn an industry?

As can be seen from my various comments and posts, I do suggest people contact an official in their state that oversees home inspectors. You level your complaint against home inspectors and in part on builders, and you suggest that we trust a plumber, electrician or contractor. That can be good advice; however, it can also be spectacularly bad advice. I do not repair homes that I inspect, so I do not have a stake if a repair is made or not. An electrician or plumber may emphasize a problem to encourage you to hire them for the repair, and that repair may not be needed. Buyers need to evaluate their potential home inspector, electrician, plumber, or any other person. Condemning an industry seems to me to be reactionary, which is not a thoughtful solution. The reason for this post, this blog, is to demystify the home inspection industry for others, but to also encourage improvement in my own business and the industry, and to encourage homeowners to improve their homes.

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By: Mary http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/for-the-homeowner/home-maintenance-for-the-homeowner/home-inspection-scams/#comment-4856 Mon, 20 Feb 2012 17:44:25 +0000 http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/?p=119#comment-4856 I suggest people never consult a property inspector. Before signing on the dotted line I suggest you all hire a plumber, electrician, and contractor to go over the house you want to purchase. Home inspectors in my opinion arent worth it. They are a waste of time and money. This suggestion is really your only defence in truly knowing what you are purchasing. Please do not get stuck with a money pit. Hire the above people, and perhaps a lawyer. I hope one day home inspectors are a thing of the past. Many of them are clueless about home construction, plumbing or electricity. The training they get is substandard in many states. If you are in a situation where a Home inspection has gone really bad report that inspector to your state licensing department. Constact your legislators and insist on strictor guidelines for propery inspectors. There aren’t enough teeth in the existing laws which hold these inspectors accountable, same applies for builders. I really dont care if this offends property inspectors either. It is high time potential buyers truly start to advocate for themselves by following through with the suggestions I have stipulated. Peace of mind is priceless, a money pit can leave you devastated. BUYER BE WARE!

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By: frankschulteladbeck http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/for-the-homeowner/home-maintenance-for-the-homeowner/home-inspection-scams/#comment-4829 Thu, 19 Jan 2012 12:01:36 +0000 http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/?p=119#comment-4829 Willie, I am allowing your comments to be seen, even though they go against my rules.

First, maybe you should spend some time reading what has been written, before going on your tirade. You have made some mistakes. I do believe that most home inspectors are honest, as I believe that is the case in most industries; however, I accept that their can be those that are less than reputable. This is normal life.

Second, someone who has to resort to insults to make his point has a weak argument. We are in business Willie (and I am not ashamed of being a professional businessman and having a business background). I make decisions based upon what is best for my business, which I see as being best for my clients. As someone who is running a business, we have to deal with the fact that there will be unhappy clients, and we need to discover a way to make things right. Whether this is your intention or not, you make the point that people with complaints are what is wrong, which is not how a professional deals with this situation.

Third, you do not know my experience level, so please do not make assumptions. Knowledgeable home inspectors are aware that the home inspection industry is run under different rules in each state. For example, in Texas, our inspections are required to meet a minimum standard of practice, and we are currently required to take an ethics course, so yes I do hold myself to that level, but I go beyond it. My goal is to help my clients, so I try to find ways to accomplish that goal. This is why I write this blog, and why I study the building industry. If most home inspectors are part of one of the national organizations, that would be news to me, since I have never seen any documentation to verify that fact. Most home inspectors that I know are part of more state organized groups.

For the other people commenting on this post, I do not think that you are nuts. I typically do not permit comments that are simply insulting others, but I find Willie’s remarks as a problem which should be exposed. Commenting without reading through shows a lack of attention to detail, a quality home inspectors need. Proclaiming others who have misgivings about our industry to be the problem is failure in comprehension on your part Willie. The home inspection industry will have its critics, and as responsible business people we should address these concerns. We have to acknowledge that there will be the less than perfect home inspector (after I wrote this post, an experienced home inspector, who was part of a national organization, made the news here for producing poor reports to help out the real estate agents he was courting). You, dear reader, have the right to be satisfied with your service. You have the right to pursue grievances. You should have a home inspector who respects you. You should have a home inspector who strives to do the best job fr you.

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By: Willie http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/for-the-homeowner/home-maintenance-for-the-homeowner/home-inspection-scams/#comment-4828 Thu, 19 Jan 2012 04:33:52 +0000 http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/?p=119#comment-4828 Ahhh! It’s all clear to me now. The man that wrote this blog is an unaffiliated home inspector which is not required to abide by any residential standards of practice.The only information that he has here on his website is that he used to be a manager for risk management. Maybe this home inspector with such limited experience, a devious mind and lack of knowledge about he home inspection industry shouldn’t be your first choice when looking to hire a home inspector. There are way too many honest, experienced, qualified, licensed, insured, informed home inspectors out there for you to settle for this one.

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By: Willie http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/for-the-homeowner/home-maintenance-for-the-homeowner/home-inspection-scams/#comment-4827 Thu, 19 Jan 2012 04:25:28 +0000 http://yourhoustonhomeinspector.com/?p=119#comment-4827 You people are nuts. As a home inspector I would never risk my license or my reputation for a few extra dollars. Reading these comments turns my stomach. It’s sad to think that most of you are a microcosm of everything that’s wrong with our country today. People nowadays make it impossible for a small businessman to provide superior customer service without the customer thinking that he has some type of alterior motive. The man that wrote this blog has no idea what the hell he is talking about. Most home inspectors belong to a national affiliation which requires them to abide by a residential standards of practice and like myself most are not stupid enough to risk their license and reputation over a few dollars. These residential standards practice prohibit home inspectors from working on any component of a home that they inspect. In all my years in the home inspection industry I have never heard of anything that even came close to what was described in this man’s blog. If you want to talk about a scam in the home inspection industry let’s talk about errors and omissions insurance that we as home inspectors are required to carry. Since 2006 statewide there have only been 11 lawsuits pertaining to home inspectors. Yet each home inspector is required to pay roughly $2000 per year for errors and omissions insurance. This does not include a $5000.00 deductible should we ever need to use our insurance. The time I ever needed to use my insurance was when I fell through a ceiling in a garage. I ended up calling one of my all subcontractors to repair the damage and paid for it out-of-pocket. It is my firm belief that the man that wrote this blog spent too much time in risk management and he can’t see anything because he has his head too far up his ass. From what I’m reading in the comments above there are a few of you that could use a little fresh air as well. Next time any of you buy a home you are more than welcome to have your uncle Bob inspect your home. Good luck with that!!!

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